Knitting Mistakes

Knitting Mistakes

My cabled dress is coming along better than expected. I’ve never knitted a sweater of any sort, so the pattern I’ve used had many parts I had to learn.

Some things I figured out quite easily, while other parts of the pattern was learned through trial and error. I’ve frogged and tinked so many times, I’ve become much better at following vague directions. The pattern is considered advanced, so knitting correctly gives me a tremendous confidence boost. However, to keep me grounded and not let that confidence give me a big head, I occasionally make a mistake and not realize it until further down the pattern, because I don’t pay close enough attention to my work.

The sweater I’m working on is cabled. It’s covered in them. I’ve become addicted to cabling because of the beautiful results. As you can see here, I’ve made a terrible mistake.

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I didn’t realize my cable error until I finished the yoke, sewn the seam, and picked up along the edge. Well, you live and you learn. I guess this part of the sweater will be hidden behind a scarf, pin, or cardigan. πŸ˜€

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Fair Isle Wrap

Fair Isle Wrap

Fair isle patterns are so beautiful and intricate I’ve been anxious to learn how to make pieces using fair isle techniques. I’m not ready for sweaters and cardigans, so I thought I’d try something simple, like a wrap!

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I came across this beautiful wrap and made up my mind right then this would be the project I would make to work on fair isle techniques.

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Such a beautiful knitted piece! I’m thinking of different colors, although the original slate gray and sky blue works beautifully!

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The instructions are simple enough. Just repeat part of the chart until the wrap is the proper length.

The pattern is free for download at ravelry.

I’ve been working hard on my cabled dress, perhaps it’s time for a break! I’d love to get started on this just to see how well I am as a beginner!

Slowly but Surely

Slowly but Surely

I’m still very much a novice even though I’ve been knitting for a while now. Trying new endeavors and really challenging myself is the best way for me to learn.

I’ve been working on that dress from my first blog post and got to this point:

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I’ve frogged my progress 4 times until I was happy with my results. I think I have it right.

Thank goodness for the internet. I’ve found plenty of resources showing techniques, and even a knit-along for this pattern (it’s for the tunic version):

Cable Luxe Tunic Knit-Along: Let’s Get Started!

Progress is slow since I’m still new to most of what I’m doing with this pattern. The best way to learn is to immerse myself in it. Still trying to finish it this year on top of the many other things I have planned. πŸ˜€

My Knitting Needles

My Knitting Needles

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Everyone has their own opinions about what the best knitting needles are. Straight or circular? Metal or wood? Long tip or short tip? There are so many aspects that go into what makes the perfect needles.

Quality and price go hand in hand. A set you’d pay thirty dollars for is going to be better than the set you pay a dollar for. No really, you can buy needles at the Mighty Dollar for one dollar. They also have novelty yarn, but that’s for another post.

It comes down to preference. Some prefer metal over bamboo. Metal is more slick, so stitches slide off easier. Bamboo will hold onto the stitches better. If you’re a tight knitter, metal might be better. If your stitches are loose, or if you let go of the needle often when you knit, bamboo needles will help keep your stitches in place.

I knit with bamboo circular needles for a couple of reasons.

1. I knit loose stitches and often let go of one needle to wrap the yarn around the other needle. I don’t hold any tension in my hand when I knit, I just let the yarn dangle. It’s a slow method, but I’m working on it.

2. Circular needles will hold all the stitches. Straight needles hold stitches well too, but with circulars, I’ll have a shorter needle and plenty of space to keep my work spread out so I can see my progress.

Bamboo is my tool of choice. I own metal needles and I own straight needles. Bamboo circulars are what I’m most comfortable with.

My favorite bamboo needles are Takumi Clover interchangeable needles.

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Photo:craftsy

In this set there are sizes 3 through 15 with 5 cord lengths, which allows for 60 combinations! I save a lot of money by buying interchangeable needles instead of fixed needles individually.

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Photo: craftsy

I’ve had these needles for 6 months now and have never had a problem. Even when I knitted my self into a tight spot, the needles’ durability allowed me to work through the problem without trouble. As I researched what sets to buy, I did come across poor reviews for the Clover kit. These reviews were for older versions and the company fixed any issues that would arise so now there are no problems. Like I’ve said, I’ve had my set for 6 months and have had no snags or cords coming undone.

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Photo: craftsy
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Photo: craftsy

This set goes for around 170 USD, BUT if you manage to find a bargain in the form of x amount of percent off, take advantage. Deals are out there. I got my set at my local craft store at 60% off!

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These needles come in their own case, so you can keep them neat and organized.

Bottom line: if you’re looking for an affordable way to have many different needle sizes and circular lengths, then interchangeable sets are the way to go. If you prefer bamboo, then why not give Takumi Clover circulars a try? Just be sure to catch one on sale somewhere. They’re always on sale somewhere.

Cabled Bag

Cabled Bag

I found a beautiful cable pattern that I just had to use on something. I’ve made enough scarves and hats, so I thought why not make a bag instead? I can practice sewing seams and adding lining all the while seeing just how complex a pattern I can work with.

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The pictures don’t do the project justice. I need to invest in better camera equipment if I want to impress anyone. I’m thinking maybe combining two different patterns into one pattern and making a large bag, or better yet, a blanket. I’m slowly mastering working with cables, so I’m addicted to using them!

Vintage Yarn

Vintage Yarn

I was given some yarn a few months ago and I’ve been sitting on my stash because I can never agree to what I want to make. The yarn is vintage, probably bought in the 90’s and kept in storage until now.

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Coats and Clark The Pounder
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Bernat Berella 4
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Lionbrand Pamela

There is something special about vintage yarn. Especially yarn that’s at least 20 years old. Maybe I should try a vintage pattern?

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/search#query=Vintage